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I have a problem with cold fingertips on my hikes. For the sake of argument, let's say it's between 20 and 25 degrees farenheit.  At the start of the hike my fingertips will get cold and incredibly painful. The type of glove/mitten does not seem to make a difference. The thing is, after a certain period of time, say 20-30 minutes, my hands will eventually warm up to the point where I could actually take my gloves off. It's weird. It's clearly a circulation problem, maybe some degree of Raynaud's. Any ideas? It would be great if I could minimize that first half hour of agony. Thanks.

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balzaccom

My wife suffers through Raynaud's on every trip that includes cold mornings.  We've even stopped hiking so that I can hold her icy hand in my warmer hands.  It's not a fun condition.  The good news is that after about half an hour of hiking, things seem to improve.  Of course, I guess she could do 30 minutes of some kind of exercise before we hit the trail, but hiking is as good as anything else for that....

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Dogwood

Up to 75% of people are chronically dehydrated. Getting and staying hydrated increases blood flow to digits. Getting and staying hydrated is something we can forget about as a requirement during winter. Coffee, actually caffeine, and nicotine constrict blood vessels. Avoid them. Wear loose clothing rather than overly restrictive apparel.  Keep core warm. When the core and head is lacking warmth heat can be taken from appendages to warm the core.  Massage your hands.  Being obese or over wt - diabetic - also can impede circulation. The inverse can be true too. Being overly lean  can result in numb digits. Medical conditions such as anemia and hypothyroidism can result incold fingers and hands. Get a med check up. 

There are various gloves that have a pouch, maybe zippered,  on the top that a chemical heat pack can be placed.  

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balzaccom

"Up to 75% of people are chronically dehydrated. Getting and staying hydrated increases blood flow to digits. Getting and staying hydrated is something we can forget about as a requirement during winter. Coffee, actually caffeine, and nicotine constrict blood vessels. Avoid them. Wear loose clothing rather than overly restrictive apparel.  Keep core warm. When the core and head is lacking warmth heat can be taken from appendages to warm the core.  Massage your hands.  Being obese or over wt - diabetic - also can impede circulation. The inverse can be true too. Being overly lean  can result in numb digits. Medical conditions such as anemia and hypothyroidism can result incold fingers and hands. Get a med check up."

Dogwood, that is very generalized advice--good for what it is--but not really applicable if the OP is in fact seeing Raynaud's symptoms.  My wife clearly suffers from this, and even in the summer, if the temps drop below about 40 degrees.  No among of clothing or hydration has any real effect at all.  Her caffein in take is minimal.  She doesn't smoke.  She is in excellent health and physical condition.  And she dresses appropriately for the conditions---wearing far more clothes that I do.  And only her hand turn nearly blue with cold from this condition.  Exercise and time are the only real solutions. 

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Dogwood

Exercise and time are the only real solutions. 

Medical opinions say something different.

According to scientists  other solutions to proactively address Raynaud's symptoms exist if in fact Raynauds Disease was not merely mentioned as a possible diagnosis but was actually diagnosed. I have Secondary Raynauds. I was tested for it through Cold Stimulation Test “capillaroscopy", C reactive lab test, and a few other tests. While I was told to exercise and allowing time to warm back up they were not the "only" solutions I was offered. I shared some  of the other ways to manage and possibly lessen and avoid symptoms. I have the written recs from the MD's somewhere but these two links sums up most of what I was told.

https://www.healthline.com/health/cold-stimulation-test-for-raynauds-phenomenon#results

https://exercisesforinjuries.com/10-ways-to-reduce-symptoms-of-raynauds-disease/

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balzaccom

My apologies.  My wife doesn't drink much caffeine or alcohol, and she doesn't smoke.  She's also well past the age of thirty, but exercises regularly and is in good shape--and relatively low stress  So in her case, the only variables left are warming up her muscles and time...

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Dogwood

No apologies. You're good. You're stand up.

Gets below 40* Goosefeet Down booties get included in the kit and shell choice has hand pockets. LOL.

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balzaccom

We've tried the hand warmers--little packets in the pockets.  They help.  But she uses hiking poles, so she can't hike with her hand in the pockets!, 

Edited by balzaccom
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