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Issue 52 has been released! Download your own high definition PDF copy with a TrailGroove Premium Subscription or read online in standard definition here.



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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/21/2021 in all areas

  1. Hi all, New member, first post. I'll jump right into it. I'm planning a trip to Yellowstone this summer with a friend. She has a boy who will turn 3 a couple months before our expected travel dates. I'm curious if anyone has any recommendations on various hikes that they've done in Yellowstone with toddlers in regards to ease/safety. Both my friend and myself are very capable hikers. I regularly hike 5-7 miles 1-2 times per week, sometimes over 10 on a weekend while carrying a 35lb pack. My friend also used to hike a lot, though she has tapered off since becoming a single mother (she is s
    1 point
  2. The suggestions on what to bring Pomeroki were based on the complications that I have had with friend's children on the trail, over the years. Many of these outings were stopped short due to insect bites, rashes, blisters, sunburn, lack of sanitation (think diapers and number 2's on the trail for children), allergies, and minor cuts and scrapes, and rashes. I would even suggest bringing tampons, as if they are not used for sanitary purposes, the tube can be used as a bellow for a fire, and the cotton can be used for fire starting, nose bleeds, or as a sterile gauze pad. The fruit drink boxes
    1 point
  3. Would wholeheartedly second that. One little thing which I'd like to point out: in a chaotic, scenic environnment like the Sierras or the Alps, an altimeter is much more important and convenient than a compass. Compasses are for the wide open or rather non-structured forests, or the sea, whereas in the mountains, you'd rather use the altimeter. Happy trails!
    1 point
  4. As a follow-up to Curry Caputo's excellent Issue 52 article Of Life and of Maine's 100 Mile Wilderness, a story that details a family backpacking journey through the wilderness of Maine and to the top of Mount Katahdin, here is the full narrated, audio version of the story alongside video documenting the entire trip. You can read the original article here in Issue 52, and watch and listen to the video below:
    1 point
  5. You're traveling, assumed under a wide diversity of conditions, so quantity of gear is not the approach I'd rec. Instead I'd prioritize low to mid cost apparel and gear that addresses a diversity of conditions. For example a free standing tent is more diverse than a hammock. Where I would be willing to spend more money is on my sleep system and dialing in my footwear as you'll be spending most if not all your time in one of these. I would not prioritize UL wt gear over other metrics like reliability, purchase cost, diversity of usage and durability striking a balance. Don't be stupid light!
    1 point



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