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Trail Tip 22: Shelters


Aaron

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For new and experienced hikers, the vast array of tents, tarps, and hybrid shelters can be pretty daunting to wade through. First off, there are 4 main groups of shelters - double wall shelters, single wall shelters, tarps, and bivouac sacks. If you plan to backpack in a well-treed area, hammocks can also be considered. Double wall shelters are the most common tent, mainly because they offer versatility in venting and pitching options. Most will have a mesh inner tent with an external rainfly, while some may have solid panels on the inner tent for wind protection. Single wall shelters opt for a solid wall of waterproof material, which will limit its ability to breathe, but lightens the overall weight and simplifies the setup…

Ted Ehrlich with tips on shelter selection and considerations, take a look at the full article below in Issue 22:

Shelters – An Introduction

How to sSelect a Backpacking Shelter and Tent

Issue 22 Page 1

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Cajunhiker

Anyone have any thoughts on using one of those Emergency Reflective Survival Tents made of Mylar (they look like aluminum foil lol) as a primary tent inside the Grand Canyon during the summer, where temps can reach over 100 degrees?

I like that they are super light. My concern is they seem to be for an emergency shelter during the winter, as I think they are designed to contain heat. But I wonder if they also reflect heat, and would be good for inside the canyon?

Thoughts, anyone?

image.jpg

Edited by Cajunhiker
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My real tent probably doesn't weigh significantly more than that, ventilates a lot better, and doesn't make a crinkly noise in a brieeze. This looks like something you'd keep in your truck for an emergency situation. Rather have my SMD Lunar Solo.

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Brandon_0384

Desert heat is different than the heat you are accustomed to.  The temp can drop 30+ deg just by finding shade.  Your best friend is shade and a cool breeze.  Just remember to stay hydrated because the desert wind will really sap your hydration levels. I would stick to a purpose built shelter, ever heard of sand fleas?

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On 7/4/2015, 5:16:21, Cajunhiker said:

Anyone have any thoughts on using one of those Emergency Reflective Survival Tents made of Mylar (they look like aluminum foil lol) as a primary tent inside the Grand Canyon during the summer, where temps can reach over 100 degrees?

I like that they are super light. My concern is they seem to be for an emergency shelter during the winter, as I think they are designed to contain heat. But I wonder if they also reflect heat, and would be good for inside the canyon?

Thoughts, anyone?

image.jpg

It's designed to prevent heat loss in cold weather. Umm, not my idea of what I'd take down into the GC during summer, 

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