Jump to content

Issue 53 has been released! Download your own high definition PDF copy with a TrailGroove Premium Subscription or read online in standard definition here.



Sleeping bag/quilt 20 vs 30


Reflex
 Share

Recommended Posts

The people I know who use quilts say there's a learning curve for using them without getting cold. They are versatile but have to be twisted just right to prevent drafts. One guy specifically recommended going with a quilt rated colder because it won't be too warm in warmer weather. I use a 30 degree mummy bag for most conditions I encounter, but would go with the 20 degree quilt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is so frustrating bc I have no clue. I will be going in the Southeast more bc thats where I live, but who know where else in the country or the world I will go this year. I expect I will roast in a 20 in the south east in spring and summer. Not sure how big diff there is between a 20 and a 30 in the warm months??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unlike a mummy bag, a quilt doesn't completely cover you unless you do a burrito wrap. In the summer you just pull it over you with your feet, arms & shoulders out and lots of ventilation from the sides.

There's little chance you'll be completely satisfied with your first purchase anyway, so maybe get a cheap 40 degree bag for this summer and think about this again next fall after you have more experience to base a decision on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most of my trips are in the SE (smokies, Slickrock, Big South Fork,...) If you think you will be out between November and March get the 20 degree quilt, it looks like it is an extra couple of ounces and $15. If it is too warm, you can easily vent to release heat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well Im getting an Enlightened quilt so the weight difference is not an issue for me. Its only like 5 ounces more

Link to comment
Share on other sites

33 minutes ago, Reflex said:

Well Im getting an Enlightened quilt so the weight difference is not an issue for me. Its only like 5 ounces more

FWIW, There are people who will pay and extra $100 to save an ounce :)

But I agree, a couple more ounces and a couple more dollars get you a more versatile quilt, hence my recommendation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Premium Member
Aaron Zagrodnick

If in between I'd personally always go with the warmer choice - being cold isn't any fun. I'd say if it's possible now or eventually though a combination of 2 bags makes for a really versatile setup to handle anything from warm to cool to cold nights all in stride. I use a Zpacks 20 degree 3 seasons out of the year, and add in another lightweight, wide, mummy to the system for true winter trips (the temp combo for this type of approach would vary depending on typical location).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll contradict Aaron here and say go with the lighter, less warm choice. You can always bring another layer to sleep in if it proves too cold for the time and place you'll be hiking in. But if you get the heavier quilt you are stuck with the weight, even when it is overkill. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...