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Not sure about Therm-a-Rest Z Lite Sol Sleeping Pad


Reflex
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Used it this weekend. I sleep on all sides including the sides so my hip bones werent happy. Wondering is people out there how figured out some kind of hack to make it work? I love how light weight it is and would hate to get a heavier pad. Thoughts?

https://www.rei.com/product/829826/therm-a-rest-z-lite-sol-sleeping-pad?cm_mmc=cse_PLA_GOOG-_-8298260002&CAWELAID=120217890000830615&lsft=cm_mmc:cse_PLA_GOOG

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Fold it in half - your calves & feet don't need the padding. Finding a soft concave place to lay on helps a lot as well. I used one of these until I decided I was just too old to not have an inflatible pad. I still carry mine along with my XLite if I think I'll need something to sit on of if it's cold or there's snow on the ground.

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Aaron Zagrodnick

Hey Reflex, although I've put in my share of nights on a Ridgerest or ZRest / ZLite in the past I never really slept all that well...but some are able to pull it off! I do still use a cut down ZLite, but it's actually for my dog to sleep on (and if I don't keep a close eye she ends up on my Exped Synmat :D) and I use a Ridgerest combined with my air pad for winter. If you think an inflatable sleeping pad might help there are some good lightweight / insulated options out there that would be around the same weight as a regular ZLite like the NeoAir XLite, Exped Synmat UL 7, etc.

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Reflex, I'm a side sleeper and I've found that the Big Agnes Q-Core SL works great for me.  It is an inflatable pad, not a closed cell pad, but it's thick enough for side sleeping.  The R-value is 4.5, and weights in at 18 oz., and it packs up small.  Maybe an inflatable pad might be worthwhile checking in to...

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I've used the Zlite exclusively for three season trips for several years and am a side sleeper. The key, as Toejam alluded to, is to scoop out a little depression to take the pressure off your hips. It doesn't need to be deep, less than an inch is effective. It also has the benefit of keeping you from sliding downhill at night. I've given up on inflatables, except for snow camping, as they all spring a leak sooner or later. 

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But wouldn't scooping out a depression in the ground run counter to Leave No Trace principles?  I'm not sure I'd be willing to do that to get a good night's rest while camping.

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With the heel of your boot.  Fill it in before you leave.

Young people get by with them fine. We used ensolite. 

Now it is impossible to be too thick.

Edited by ppine
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What is scooped out can be scooped back in.  It only takes a few seconds.  I suppose digging a hole in a meadow would leave a scar, but meadows make poor camping spots; I prefer forest duff or well-drained gravelly soil.  These surfaces are readily restored. 

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