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Good lightweight non mummy Sleeping bag?


boru12
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I am not a fan of mummy sleeping bags. I would like to find a square style one with compression bag.  I came to this forum hoping for suggestions, anyone have any?

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@boru12 There are going to be few (if any) options in the "traditional" square sleeping bag for something lightweight and compressible. There are however some "non-traditional" styles of bags that can fit those criteria. I will list some options below (not inclusive) to get you started on your search. I too dislike traditional mummy bags, but they will always be the lightest most compressible option. Consider a higher fill down bag paired with something like a Sea-to-Summit waterproof eVent compression bag to help achieve the small size.


Sea to Summit Trek Tk I: Tapered rectangle, 32 degree rating, 1lb 13oz, (http://www.seatosummit.com/product/?item=Trek+Tk+I&o1=0&o2=0&o3=041RR)

NEMO Nocturne 30: Spoon shape, 30 degree rating, 2lbs 1oz, (http://www.nemoequipment.com/product/?p=Nocturne%2030%20Reg)

*Sierra Designs Backcountry bed: zipper-less bag with a built in quilt, ratings from around 15 degrees to 40 degrees depending on bag, weight from 1.5lbs to 3.5lbs depending on fill weight and temperature rating (http://www.sierradesigns.com/sleeping-bags/bed-style)

Big Agnes Lost Ranger: System bag (non-mummy w/integrated pad sleeve), weight varies by style as well as temperature rating (Lost Ranger is a 15 degree bag), (https://www.bigagnes.com/Products/ProductFinder/Bag/filters/18)

Those are just 4 of the mainstream companies that are "thinking outside the box" when it comes to bag shapes and styles. You can also look at quilts as an option. As with these examples I showed above, there are various configurations, temp ratings, etc. but this should get you looking in the right direction. Let me know if you have more specific questions after looking and I will gladly fill you in. Or if you have comfort questions, I either own(ed) or have slept in all listed above. 

*My personal favorite

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Mcaldwell Thanks you have given me a lot of info here. I did look through it and I think I maybe leaning towards a Teton Celsius -18. Thoughts? Here is my situation. I have an old Marlboro sleeping bag that My mother purchased for me 20 years ago with Marlboro Miles. it is thin and light and by far still my favorite sleeping bag since I mostly hiked and camped in the summer. In recent years I camp closer to winter all the time and recently purchased property backed up to the Adirondack Sate Park. I explore a lot usually sleep outside the tent weather permitting. I stay pretty warm but on cold night I use a sleep sack I made with a flannel sheet and that seems to work pretty well but on the real cold nights its not quite enough. I am also very claustrophobic mostly in the feet area. I lose my mind when they are restricted not unlike George Costanza. which is where most my dislike for for mummy bags comes from. I also like to put things like underwear (socks, t-shirt, Boxers,long sleeves and the like) in the bottom of the bag for morning comfort. A lot of unnecessary info here but it may give you a good idea where I am at. thanks again 

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You might like quilts instead of traditional bags, but that's a big switch to make with some adaptations needed, probably, and I guess it wouldn't totally solve your foot-freedom issues.  You might look at the North Face 40F Dolomite syn bags...inexpensive, very good quality, and they have it in both a rectangular and semi-rectangular model.  If you can find comfort in a semi-rec, you will save a ton of bulk and a little weight compared to a full rectangular bag.  With colder-rated sleeping bags, the weight/bulk really becomes a bigger issue for backpacking, where down and light shell fabrics are winners...big jump in price, of course, but totally worth it if you can afford to do that instead.  Hard to find many rectangular bags that aren't just heavy car-campers, and not very many semi-rec bags either.  Keep in mind that with all the extra space those roomier designs provide, they are less efficient at keeping you warm compared to a mummy design that fits your body more closely and puts the insulation loft right next to your skin...this means that you might need a bag rated for considerably colder temps than you will be camping in (more than the usual offset), which only further adds to the weight/bulk issue.  You might also check out the Nemo spoon-style bags...unique approach and most people love them.  The synthetic models aren't great in terms of weight/bulk but the down models are pretty respectable.  Quite a bit more expensive than the cheapie Teton you mentioned above or the North Face I mentioned, but you might be able to find them on closeout still (Sierra Trading Post had a bunch of them not too long ago). 

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I thank everyone who has contributed in trying to help me find a suitable Sleeping bag for me. A lot of products are, as you all know, quite expensive and I have been able to keep cost way below a lot of whats available out there. I have had the gear I have now (a bunch of no name "cheap" stuff) for many years and it has been working fine.  Though I can afford anything mentioned I think I may just sew myself up and sleep sack liner with an old sheet and for the most part problem solved. I was able to hike and camp out for a couple days in Dec/2015 with what I have and toughed it out so I think that is what I am going to do. I do have a nice mummy I received as a gift some years ago I just prefer my comfort.  Thanks again to everyone.  

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  • 1 year later...
  • Premium Member
Aaron Zagrodnick

Just an FYI and for anyone else that might be looking for a similar bag, REI has a pretty good selection of rectangular and semi-rectangular sleeping bags, both in down and synthetic options that might be worth a look:

https://www.rei.com/c/sleeping-bags?r=category%3Asleeping-bags-and-accessories|sleeping-bags%3Bsleeping-bag-shape%3ASemirectangular|Rectangular&origin=web&ir=category%3Asleeping-bags-and-accessories

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  • 3 months later...
Grey Mouse

I'm a hammock sleeper myself but I have a similar issue. A mummy bag is claustrophobic and although I don't have restless legs I do like to move them at night. You don't mention a temperature rating but usually once you go below a 20° rating you'll find that most bags are mummy style in order to retain heat and get that rating. I would suggest getting an appropriately rated insulated sleeping inflatable pad (Exped Megamat 10 for real cold weather) with a 1/4" Gossemer gear pad (1/8" for summer) underneath if needed in order to reach a low rating. Btw, the Gossamer Gear pad goes on the bottom if your unfamiliar with it. I would then suggest a non-tapered top quilt in the degree rating that you wish but starting at -10° even they will be mummy style (you can stack two lesser quilts if needed). I would not suggest a snap closure style bottom for weather under 40°. The snap bottom allows you to unsnap and use it like a blanket. If you need a negative degree quilt that is not tapered just ask George at Locolibre to see if he can make you one. The Exped series comes in many sizes and insulative ratings. I use a Therm-a-rest Trail Scout for above 40°  (shoulder season) for both ground and hammock (double hammock) sleeping. It takes the shivers away at 50° all by itself (for underneath insulation). Here is a link to the gear: 

https://www.gossamergear.com/collections/sleeping-pads  

https://www.rei.com/product/865152/therm-a-rest-trail-scout-sleeping-pad

https://www.rei.com/product/865152/therm-a-rest-trail-scout-sleeping-pad

https://www.locolibregear.com/gear.html#!/Ghost-Pepper-Topquilts/c/16557534/offset=0&sort=normal

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