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Walkie Talkies - What to pick?


Klayre
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I have recently made a long hike in a larger group and as we got towards the top of a mountain cliff, one of our party sprained an ankle. We were out away in the wilds and unfortunately we had no cell reception at all!

Fortunately we made it out without too much problems, but to be able to handle such a situation better in the future I have decided to invest in a good walkie talkie. I was wondering if anyone here uses them, and if they can recommend any specific models?

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No personal experience with them,but I think most walkie-talkies are short range (a couple miles at most) so would not usually be much help from a rescue point of view.

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  • 1 month later...

I used then once on a canoe trip at Lake Shasta.  They are handy for emergencies or long distance decision making.  People tend to use them a lot, which I find to be very intrusive. I go out there for the quiet and to see critters. The last thing I want is someone calling me all the time. It is too much like answering the phone at home. 

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On 5/21/2016 at 9:01 AM, ppine said:

I used then once on a canoe trip at Lake Shasta.  They are handy for emergencies or long distance decision making.  People tend to use them a lot, which I find to be very intrusive. I go out there for the quiet and to see critters. The last thing I want is someone calling me all the time. It is too much like answering the phone at home. 

You can always just leave them turned off.

My wife and I recently bought Midland's T10's. 3 7/8 oz with 3 AAA alkaline batteries.  You can probably shave half an oz off with lithium batteries.  Not sure how useful they will be at this point.  Under optimum conditions (line of sight), they are supposed to have a 20 mile range.  I have no intention of leaving them on unless actually needed.  And no idea at this point how long the batteries will last.

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  • 2 weeks later...

If you're using with a groups to keep in touch on hikes, there are plenty of 30 mile+ GMRS radios out there sold in pairs for under $100. 

If if you want one for emergency backup while you're in the mountains, look at the marine band or handheld shortwave radios. Yes, you need some specific training and a license for the shortwave, but if you have an emergency I don't think they'll be checking your FCC card when they come to provide aid. 

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You might refer to the topic of "solo hiking with a personal locator beacon" under the General Backpacking and Hiking forum.

I used to do wildlife studies in  remote areas by myself. I briefly worked for a group that insisted that I  carry a radio for emergencies. These often proved useless in terrain that would block transmissions. There were supposed to be forest service repeater stations that would help relay the transmissions but I was rarely near one. The point is, if you want something for emergencies you might consider one of the devices mentioned in the above noted forum. These work through satellites and thus not as dependant on terrain conditions. Plus they won't disturb the critters, whether human or otherwise.

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