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Pack choices for the over-packer


TxAggies
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18 hours ago, wspscott said:

I'm definitely not trying to change your hiking, I'm a big fan of HYOH as long as it doesn't affect me and you carry a big pack doesn't affect me :)

Take a look at the Seek Outside packs, they are expensive, but seem to be what you are looking for.

Thank you, I looked at those on your suggestion. Seem like good packs, but yeah a little expensive. At that price I would probably go with an Eberlestock or Tenzing as I know they can handle the abuse. 

Thanks again, you're the only one so far who didn't try to make me change my ways instead of helping with my question. 

8 hours ago, PaulGS said:

I'm a fan of Osprey packs so I'll comment on them.

I use a Volt 60, and it is comfortable up to about 40 lbs. Since the Volt 75 uses the identical shoulder strap/hipbelt system with the same amount of padding, I personally think carrying much over 40 lbs. would start to dig into the shoulders a bit too much. Great pack but probably not for the weights you are thinking of carrying.

The Aether 70 has beefier shoulder straps and a more padded hip belt so it can easily carry more weight (50+ lbs). The hip belt on the Aether can also be custom heat-molded to better fit your hips which could help with the heavier loads. I think REI stores will do the heat molding but I don't know if it's an extra charge or not.

The Atmos AG 65 is a newer Osprey pack I believe, and has a mesh back panel allowing for lots of ventilation between your back and the pack so if you're hiking in hot weather a lot that could be a consideration. It's suitable up to about 50 lbs.

Both packs are very suitable for either overnighter or multi-day trips.

Hope this helps!

Thank you. I'm leaning towards the Aether. I tried both the Aether and Atmos on in the store loaded with about 25 lbs. the Atmos was slightly more comfortable, but the Aether has many more options for carrying extra gear. I have a Goal Zero Nomad, and I couldn't find an easy way to attach it to the Atmos. 

It looks like either will be a good choice, just nitpicking over details. 

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36 minutes ago, toejam said:

I've never heard of or seen Seek Outside packs. Hard to tell what they weigh, but I like the looks of the Divide 4500. Are they sold in stores?

I think they are sold direct. I think they weigh right about 3# (depends on options), so light weight and carry a lot. As I said above, I have no experience with them, but people who spend a lot of time outside and sometimes end up carrying a heavy load seem to like them a lot. Search backpackinglight.com for more impressions.

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By all means, go find a huge pack and fill it up. They are easy to find on the internet. Just go by liters, 80 is about right for one night.

Edited by ppine
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I learned the hard way not to over-pack. I had close to 50 pounds in my pack for a one-nighter.  The best advice I could give you is bring only what you need, and forget about be-prepared items. Still bring things like first aid, but definitely limit it to a few band-aids, some aspirin, and a wrap. This way you are prepared, but also light on the load. Also, I had a major issue with bringing almost 3 times as much food as I ate. Be sure to bring enough food, but nothing more. It will save you in the end.

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5 hours ago, Zacpacker said:

I learned the hard way not to over-pack. I had close to 50 pounds in my pack for a one-nighter.  The best advice I could give you is bring only what you need, and forget about be-prepared items. Still bring things like first aid, but definitely limit it to a few band-aids, some aspirin, and a wrap. This way you are prepared, but also light on the load. Also, I had a major issue with bringing almost 3 times as much food as I ate. Be sure to bring enough food, but nothing more. It will save you in the end.

Once again: I'm well versed in carrying a heavy pack. After being in the Army, I consider 35 lbs Ultra Light, that was the first real pack I had to carry: 12 miles in 3 hours with an old school ALICE pack without the frame, and my loads afterwards just went up from there. 

I have a $250-300 budget for this summer. I have mostly what I need, but it's not the lightest of gear. My current pack, a military CFP-90, has finally called it quits and doesn't have quite enough room to pack my old, heavy, bulky gear plus the extras I need to carry for my daughters. Water for the three of us alone is going to jack up my weight. So my first priority is a pack, not $500 in ultralight gear. 

I appreciate everyone thinking that we all must go ultralight, but that's not my concern. As future trips and funds become available, then I can start lightening the load. Besides, I like the challenge of carrying heavy. In this day and age, you never know when you might need to carry as much as possible. 

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You are new at this and asking for advice. 

Consider listening to some of the responses.

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2 hours ago, ppine said:

You (TxAggies) are new at this and asking for advice. 

Consider listening to some of the responses.

How about trying to answer the question he asked. He's carrying gear for three people and you reference thru-hikers carrying 20lb packs??? Seriously?? 

TxAggie was clear in his question about his level of experience and what he is trying to accomplish. In your several responses I see nothing of relevance in your advice offered. 

Instead of offering your snarky attitude to a new poster to Trailgroove, maybe read the poster's question more carefully first before responding.

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14 hours ago, ppine said:

You are new at this and asking for advice. 

Consider listening to some of the responses.

I'm new to civilian packs, not to hiking.

Consider considering all of my responses and needs. 

11 hours ago, PaulGS said:

How about trying to answer the question he asked. He's carrying gear for three people and you reference thru-hikers carrying 20lb packs??? Seriously?? 

TxAggie was clear in his question about his level of experience and what he is trying to accomplish. In your several responses I see nothing of relevance in your advice offered. 

Instead of offering your snarky attitude to a new poster to Trailgroove, maybe read the poster's question more carefully first before responding.

Thank you, Sir. 

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15 hours ago, ppine said:

You are new at this and asking for advice. 

Consider listening to some of the responses.

His old pack is a military pack, you don't think he just might have walked a tiny bit in the past?

Some of the responses actually answered his question, your responses have not. Why should he listen to you?

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I am happy that everyone is polite. That is a hard thing to find on forums.  It is good to see people come to the defense of another poster.

There are many right answers in the outdoors, but 50 pounds for an overnight is hardly ever the right answer.

Streamline your equipment list and leave out  more just in case items.  Have the kids carry their own clothes, sleeping bag and pads. Bring light weight food.  Don't carry more water than you will need to get to the next water source. Then you should be down in the 35 pound range.

Lay everything on the floor in the living room and figure out what else to discard. Weigh the whole works.  Buy your pack last to fit the equipment list.  The badge of experience is less equipment, not more.

Sometimes traditional backpackers, and especially military trained people have a hard time streamlining their outfits. They have to unlearn some habits that add a lot of weight. Think in terms of being on the trail first, and being in camp last. 

I started this business in 1960 with a Trapper Nelson with a wood frame, cast iron frying pan, canned goods and a kapok sleeping bag. We used a tube tent and no pads.  Most of our equipment came from the military surplus store.  I used an old Alice frame pack from WWII some of the time.  Equipment choices and tech have evolved quite a bit in 55 years, and it is an advantage to learn about them.

Edited by ppine
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