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Photographing in a Forest - Photo Tip 29


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Aaron Zagrodnick

Photographing trees in a forest isn’t easy. Simplifying the complex nature of woodland settings often proves difficult at first glance. I usually walk the forest floor for hours to get a “feel” for a place and decide how best to capture its beauty. I try to notice natural corridors in the woods or look for pathways that can create interesting leading lines. Small streams or cascades cutting through the woods also create passageways. And a trail which disappears into the deep, dark forest creates a sense of mystery and wonder. I search for interesting stumps, trees with character, bright color, texture, and mostly trees with interesting light. The forest is the perfect place to look for crepuscular rays or what some people call “God rays.” Spotlighting, soft filtered light, and sun stars are also interesting light-features to look for while in the woods...

David Cobb shares another detailed hiking related photo tip, take a look in Issue 29:

Photographing in a Forest

Forest Photography Tips - Hiking.jpg

Issue 29 Page 1

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Aaron,

I am a retired forester and looking at trees is one of my favorite past times.  I especially like looking for unusual species and really giant old specimens.  I like to put together the dynamics of the way forests are formed, imagining their history from fire, logging, grazing and other agents.  I have a lot of photographs of forests all of the western US and Alaska.  Next month I will be giving a lecture on forest history, fire and the prognosis for the future. 

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Aaron Zagrodnick

Forests are certainly amazing places, ppine! A couple years ago, on an offtrail hike here in Wyoming I’d been hiking through a typical mountain forest of small and medium sized trees for hours, then crossed a talus field and upon re-entering the trees, came upon two of the largest trees, side by side, that I’ve seen here or have ever seen, far bigger than I could ever put my arms around...definitely out of place for this area. Don’t recall if they were Douglas fir or Engelmann spruce, but that’s a good excuse for another hike back!

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