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Leki Trekking Poles


Gary M

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I recently purchased a pair of Leki Khumbu trekking poles. In all my previous years, I had avoided utilizing poles for several reasons:

1. I normally like to hike as light as possible. Using these poles will add a bit over 2 pounds to my gear. This seems acceptable to me, although I know I could have spent more and saved some ounces.

2. I like to keep my hands free. On most hikes I take along my Newfoundland, Maximus. Most parks and trails require dogs be kept on a leash to protect other hikers. So I don't see how I can possibly use a set a poles, hold a leash, use a camera, get a drink, etc.

3. As I live and mainly hike in Kansas, I don't see many mountains. I would foresee using the poles with creek crossings and generally as an aid for my sometimes sore knees. My hikes usually include rolling hills, mixed woodlands or plains, with multiple creeks.

The Khumbu poles seem to be plenty strong enough so far. I especially like the comfortable handles and the easy to use adjustment system. I'll probably use them on some of the more difficult trails I hike, and perhaps on longer hikes. I purchased the Leki at a reduced, close out price. So if I don't use them very often, no big problem.

Any thoughts, comments???

Gary M

Olathe, Kansas

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Hi Gary,

I've also wrestled with the use of poles while hiking. My knees act up sometimes from old soccer injuries, and having extra support seems like a good idea. I bought a pair of Leki Luaus a few years back - it took a while to feel comfortable with them, but eventually I really appreciated the extra stability while crossing streams (I am not as sure-footed as Aaron).

Now I use adjustable Gossamer Gear LT4s, which are lighter but just as stable:

http://gossamergear.com/trekking/lt4-trekking-poles-all.html

I don't like to use them all the time though. Like you mentioned, juggling a leash, camera, etc, can be a pain, especially on easy rolling trails that you just want to enjoy. For those times, I secure the poles together on one side of my pack (Loop at the bottom & Velcro or carabiner at the top). It's pretty easy to "stow" them & take them back down.

Not sure if that helps at all... But good luck & let us know how it goes!

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tmountainnut

Trekking poles are great. i would think with a dog, you could use a leash that attaches around your waist to the dog. i have used a leash like that for running with a dog, and it will free up your hands.

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Jen and tmountainnut;

Thanks to you both, I'll try both ideas.

Since the Leki are really easy to adjust, I could shorten and tie down with just a little effort.

I've attempted to tie a leash around my waist before, but not with very good results. I think if I used a carabiner to attach the leash, it might perform better. Maximus is a very well trained and experienced trail dog, so his behavior is good. Sometimes however, I take one of our other canine crew, and they tend to get a little frisky around other dogs or wildlife. I guess I'll have to work on better trail etiquette with our other dogs a bit more.

I hiked a rocky trail (well for Kansas it's rocky) Saturday, and the poles do help. I noticed my arms were more tired, as before I didn't use them for much. This past winter I stepped into a snow covered hole, and took a pretty hard fall. So I plan on using the Leki next winter also.

(Maximus on the "rocky" trail)

Thanks, hope everyone gets some trail time before it gets so hot. Summer is on the way!!!

Gary M

Olathe, Kansas

post-135-14350871462_thumb.jpg

Edited by Gary M
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  • 4 months later...
Rick-Pittsburgh

If you are going to attach the leash to your waist keep in mind a few things. If you fall your 4 legged friend is going with you and not saying your dog is a runner and takes off after moving objects(critters) but if he does you are in pursuit as well.

Just a few initial thoughts.

On a side note I am a Leki user(Argon XL AS) and I would not be caught dead on any backcountry trip w/o my stability sticks. I added the photo adapter to mine and they now serve double duty as a mono-pod.

I took my avatar photo with them.

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I use Black Diamond poles. Their FlickLocks are absolutely reliable. I've heard too many stories from people whose twist locks poles have let go at the wrong moment. The big mistake people make when using poles is thinking of them as walking sticks, not to propel themselves forward. To make them work properly, the angle of the elbow should be at 90°, and the tips should always stay behind the feet.

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If you are going to attach the leash to your waist keep in mind a few things. If you fall your 4 legged friend is going with you and not saying your dog is a runner and takes off after moving objects(critters) but if he does you are in pursuit as well.

Just a few initial thoughts.

On a side note I am a Leki user(Argon XL AS) and I would not be caught dead on any backcountry trip w/o my stability sticks. I added the photo adapter to mine and they now serve double duty as a mono-pod.

I took my avatar photo with them.

I totally agree with your leash around the waist comment. My dog(s) are well trained, but if a deer jumps right across our trail (it's certainly happened before) well that's just too big of a temptation for most dogs.

I've have just been continuing to hold on to the leash by hand, although it's difficult. As I mentioned before, I don't use the Leki very often, trails here are pretty tame compared to what most TrailGroove readers see.

GaryM

Olathe, Kansas

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I use Black Diamond poles. Their FlickLocks are absolutely reliable. I've heard too many stories from people whose twist locks poles have let go at the wrong moment. The big mistake people make when using poles is thinking of them as walking sticks, not to propel themselves forward. To make them work properly, the angle of the elbow should be at 90°, and the tips should always stay behind the feet.

Good advise, Peter. I've got Black Diamonds, too, and I really love them. The FlickLock system works great, even when wearing heavy gloves.

Gary, I stick my hands through the wrist loops then clamp down on the handles so that the loop bands are trapped between my hands and the handle. This reduces stress on my arms, and allows me to go hands free when I need to stop to take a picture or use a hankerchief- the poles would then dangle from my wrists. REI has a good video tutorial on how to correctly use trekking poles in different situations.

Edited by HikerJen
grammar
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HikerJen,

Thanks for the REI tip, I'll check it out.

If the tips are always supposed to behind your feet, then I'm not using them properly. As you can probably tell, I do not have much experience with hiking poles. The elbow at 90 deg. part I already understand.

Gary M

Olathe, Kansas

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