Jump to content

Issue 48 has been released! Download your own high definition copy with a TrailGroove Premium Subscription and Membership or read online here.



Hiking the Theodore Solomons Trail


Aaron Zagrodnick

Recommended Posts

  • Premium Member
Aaron Zagrodnick

You’ve no doubt heard of the John Muir Trail, justly known as one of America’s premier hiking trails. Perhaps you have even hiked it (if not, put it at the top of your hiking bucket list). But the JMT is not the only long trail through the heart of the Sierra Nevada. Just 10 miles to its west, the Theodore Solomons Trail parallels the JMT. Starting at Horseshoe Meadows south of Mt. Whitney, it bears west over the Kern drainage, turns north to Mineral King, then keeps to the west sides of Sequoia, Kings Canyon, and Yosemite National Parks as it heads to Glacier Point above Yosemite Valley, 250 miles away. Along the way it passes through lush meadows and deep forests, crosses big rivers and high passes. Unlike the rock and ice cathedrals of the JMT, the TST is decidedly more montane than alpine...

In Issue 47, @HappyHour shares this trip detailing his hike on the Theodore Solomons Trail. Read the full article at the link below:

Sierra Serenity: Through the Middle Sierra on the Solomons Trail

Hiking the Theodore Solomons Trail

Issue 47 Page 1

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
Dogwood

First, nice detailed write up by Drew Smith for the Sierra article.

I'd like to know from Drew Smith if TH Nat Geo TI map collection listed at the end of his article covers the Theodore Solomon Tr/route seamlessly? I already have all the maps but one so might be easier for me. TU

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
Stephen R Young

I have hiked on the JMT several times and found the experience excellent.  After researching this trail one of the biggest problems due to the lower elevations appears to be the presence of large #'s of  rattlesnakes, particularly in the stretch through Tehipite Valley in Western Kings Canyon National Park along the Middle Fork of the Kings River past Simpson Meadow.  I know these creatures frequent this part of the park as I have run into them in Paradise Valley on the way to Cedar Grove/Roads End from Rae Lakes.  Is this another factor of climate change.  My understanding is that this trail is overgrown and hard to figure out.  I like the idea of an alternative route but am concerned about this issue.  Can you confirm or deny the problem posed by some travelers in this valley which is a primary corridor of the Solomens  trail?.

Link to post
Share on other sites
HappyHour

I missed the Simpson Meadows-Tehipite stretch due to not wanting to chance the ford of the Middle Fk Kings, so I can't comment on its snakiness. The stretch from  Rattlesnake Crossing (!) to Cassidy Bridge is at a similar altitude (6500-4500 ft) and I didn't see any snakes there.

The majority of snake bite incidents are 15-25 year old males who get bitten on the forearm. In other words, people being idiots. I grew up in Tucson in the 1960s, and it was considered good fun then to pin a snake down with a stick, grab its tail and whip it around. 

If you can refrain from doing stuff like that, your chances of being bitten by a snake are very low. Snakes have no interest in biting large mammals - they can't eat them and it is likely to lead to a stomping. Don't step on a snake, don't corner one and you will be safe. River crossings and hypothermia are far greater dangers.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...



×
×
  • Create New...