Jump to content

Issue 53 has been released! Download your own high definition PDF copy with a TrailGroove Premium Subscription or read online in standard definition here.



Gear Repair- Got a nail through boot- Anyone know how to seal?


Joseph
 Share

Recommended Posts

So I bought a pair of boots several days ago. Nothing top end- $60. Typical synthetic sole. I took them on a 15 mile hike and was really satisfied with them and felt good about my purchase. Well today I was wearing them while working around the house and I stepped on a nail. It was just long enough that I felt the tip end touch my foot. I've had them for 5 days.. Such a drag because now I know they're going to leak. I'd really like to fix them if possible. It would have to be solid though because they'll definitely see H20 and 15+ mile hikes again. Any advice? Or do I just need to get a new pair?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Joseph,

I've always used a silicone (rubber) sealant for repairs, which may be purchased at any auto repair retailer. Just ask, and get a brand that will be water proof and resist wear. Seal the hole from both sides, and make sure you let the silicone set before wearing. Be sure to test before wearing them on the trail.

If you aren't happy with the results, I guess you can just use them for cutting the grass and that killer hike to the mail box. Good luck!!

Gary M

Olathe,Kansas

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, just out of curiosity......

At $60, were the boots actually "water proof", or rather simply "water resistant"?

Nothing wrong, mind you, with an inexpensive pair of boots. As long as they are comfortable, I've gotten by at times with an under $200 pair as long as you're not getting into some heavy duty backpacking or technical trails.

Gary M

Olathe, Kansas

Edited by Gary M
Added comments
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Gary. First off, thanks for the reply. So you've actually repaired soles this way? How were you able to inject the silicone into the hole? The one in my boots is tiny; almost invisble (pretty small diameter nail). I also thought about using a tire plug, but that would require drilling the hole out a bit.

As for the boots being waterproof- I could have a misconception about the exact definition of the word, but I had water top the toe of them a few times and my feet stayed completely dry. They were also very comfortable and light. But I know you don't get something for nothing; despite working well IMO, it's anybodys guess how long they will last. I just didn't have a ton of money to fork over at the time, and it was my first hiking trip. I wasn't sure how much I'd like it (ended up loving it). I'd say the terrain was moderate- rocks, mud, streams, steep climbs- probably not the place I'd take my grandmother for her 80th, and my cheapies did fine (I had a full over-night pack on, too). That's why I wanted to try to fix them. I bet I could've got a couple years out of them. But it may be that I have to retire them to yard work early. And I only wish I had a killer hike to the mail box.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To do repairs on my shoes I have used Shoe GOO. It dries similar to silicone but is somewhat smelly when applied. I've used it to repair soles pulling away from shoes and small holes on the toes of running and hiking shoes. When it dries the repaired area is very tough and flexible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Joseph,

The silicone sealant I've used before (sorry, can't remember the brand name) has a nozzle type tip which comes in handy to get the rubber sealant to the exact spot you want it. PaulGS mentioned Shoe GOO, which I've also used for repairs. As I recall, it's like applying glue, and when allowed to dry can really do the trick.

The main thing to me, is to have comfortable hiking boots/shoes. I feel you can spend a bundle on equipment, but its all wasted unless your feet are in good shape while hiking. Through the years I've spent a wide range of cash on boots (both expensive and rather cheap); comfort is all that really matters to me. I usually wear my favorite pair till the tread is worn off. If I find a particular good fit, I buy a second pair anticipating the day I wear out the first pair. If you wore them on a 15 miler with an over-night pack, they are well worth saving or (if needed) buying a second pair.

Gary M

Olathe, Kansas

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rick-Pittsburgh

ShoeGoo works. Many cobblers use Barge Cement. Another product to look at is 5.10s Stealth Paint which is actually liquid rubber in a tube. Once it dries it can be sanded, etc. I have used it to make rands on my footwear, etc due to the amount of rocks we have out here in "Rocksylvania."

Here are a few links for the Barge cement and Stealth paint if you would like to explore these option a lil more in depth(ShoeGoo is readily available so I see no need to link it.)

Barge Cement:

http://www.rakuten.com/prod/barge-283707-barge-cement-toluene-free-2oz/226636691.html?listingId=192570102&scid=pla_google_UnbeatableSale&adid=18178&gclid=CJ3Q2u2krr0CFWXl7AodTVUAHw

Stealth Paint:

https://fiveten.com/products/accessories-detail/4280-stealthr-paint-kit

....hope this helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 years later...
  • Premium Member
Aaron Zagrodnick

Hey Joseph,

I'm sure you've likely resolved your issue but was just thinking about what I'd do in this situation / for others that might have the same problem - I'd think such a small hole could possibly be self-sealing so I'd try a submersion test at home and see how the results look.

If the shoe did leak,  I'd go with something along the lines that you were originally thinking - sealing the nail hole
with something else, but I think I'd try to re-purpose something vs the tire kit - possibly cutting and shaping a rubber piece from the sole of an old shoe for example, old bike tire, etc.,  or whatever else I might find laying around - and shaping it to just a bit larger than the nail that caused the issue.

I'd then coat that piece with the aforementioned Shoe Goo (which I've also used successfully in the past) or something like McNett Sil-Net:

https://www.rei.com/product/705425/gear-aid-silnet-silicone-seam-sealer-15-oz

...which I always seem to have on hand for tents and repairs. I'd think once that was in, trimmed, and the sealant cured you should be good!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...