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Golite gear


tmountainnut
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tmountainnut

i figured i'd pass this along to anyone on here. if you're looking for a really nice sleeping bag or some outdoor gear, golite has all of their gear at 50% off their "retail" prices right now, and if you do a review of their gear, you can get an addtional code for 20% off. i have their 40* and 0* adrenaline bags, an older version of their jam 35 pack, and some of their rain gear. all of it is top notch gear.

If you need a code, post below and i'll do another review to get a code.

the code also works on the clearance closet stuff too, which is already ridiculously cheap.

-Ted

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i figured i'd pass this along to anyone on here. if you're looking for a really nice sleeping bag or some outdoor gear, golite has all of their gear at 50% off their "retail" prices right now, and if you do a review of their gear, you can get an addtional code for 20% off. i have their 40* and 0* adrenaline bags, an older version of their jam 35 pack, and some of their rain gear. all of it is top notch gear.

If you need a code, post below and i'll do another review to get a code.

the code also works on the clearance closet stuff too, which is already ridiculously cheap.

-Ted

I just got my new REI bag in the mail and I'm afraid it's too heavy at 3 lb 9 oz and HUGE. I'm now looking at a Go Lite, the W Adventure 4 Season, regular, 650 fill at 3 lb 2 oz or one from backcountry.com called Stoic Vamp 15. Similar 650 fill but at 2 lb 8 oz. Any thoughts?

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tmountainnut

if you're lookng for a true 0* bag, its going to weigh around 3 lbs or more, and will be big. theres no way around it. even the nicest ones by western mountaineering and feathered friends weigh ~3lbs, and use a large stuff sack. pair a 0 degree bag with a pad with an R value of 5+, and you'll be set

they have the womens 0* adrinaline bags in the clearance closet for $160 plus shipping with a coupon code. 800 fill down, and a full draft collar. (bottom of the page)

http://www.golite.com/Clearance.aspx

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if you're lookng for a true 0* bag, its going to weigh around 3 lbs or more, and will be big. theres no way around it.

What I really want is not to be cold and not to fill my pack up with one sleeping bag. Is it possible to have it both ways? I won't likely ever spend the night out in the winter, but the Sierras's in the early summer can get to about freezing. Would a warmer rated bag 20 or so, with a warm Jammie layer suffice?

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As tmountainnut says, a true 0 F bag is going to be a little big, and weigh between 2.75 - 3 lbs, and this is for a good quality bag that uses a higher power down fill.

I would suggest to look for sleeping bags with EN ratings on them. This is a good way to truly compare bags temperature ratings to one another, but also understand that it is not a definite. Each person will "sleep" differently, as well, the environmental conditions as well as your current physical conditions will also dictate how you sleep at the moment. So, an EN rating is somewhere to start.

Although, some companies such as Western Mountaineering (WM) or Feathered Friends (FF) do not EN rate their sleeping bags, but they are tried and true and are pretty accurate on their rating. Still though, for a woman, I would rate a bag 10 F higher than what it is listed at (if it is a 10 F bag, for a woman I would rate it at 20 F) simply because on average, women do sleep colder than men.

Also, I would suggest that in "winter" conditions, to get a sleeping bag rated about 10 F lower than what you are planning for. So, if you are expecting temps to about 30 F, I would say get something rated at 10 F, since you as a woman would probably only be comfortable to about 20 F in a 10 F sleeping bag. (Just my opinion. I have never heard anyone say that they wish they had brought less sleeping bag in sub freezing temps...of course within reason...don't carry a -60 F bag for 30 F temperatures... :) )

Now, if you want to get as small & light, but still every bit as warm, in a sleeping bag...you will need at least a high power down fill. I would recommend at least 800 down fill, but you can go as high as 900 down fill. Another good way to cut back on weight is by getting an appropriately sized sleeping bag. WM makes some of their bags to fit a wide range of people. Some fo the bags will fit people that are 5'6", 6' or 6'6". (And some are even offered for those up to 7'.)

I think a good bag to look at would be the WM Versalite. If you can fit in a 5'6" bag, this bag will come in at 1 lb 14 oz. But, even if you have to go for the 6' version, it still weighs in at 2 lbs even! However, if you wanted, you could add another 3 oz of overfill in this bag (which is usually free if you order from Hermit's Hut). The down side is that the price tag for this bag is as much as $480...

Anyway, I hope this helps some...

And yeah...I have been eyeballing those Jam packs pretty good for a while. I doubt I will get one though, but it is a great deal for those looking for a backpack in this size...

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As tmountainnut says, a true 0 F bag is going to be a little big, and weigh between 2.75 - 3 lbs, and this is for a good quality bag that uses a higher power down fill.

I would suggest to look for sleeping bags with EN ratings on them. This is a good way to truly compare bags temperature ratings to one another, but also understand that it is not a definite. Each person will "sleep" differently, as well, the environmental conditions as well as your current physical conditions will also dictate how you sleep at the moment. So, an EN rating is somewhere to start.

Although, some companies such as Western Mountaineering (WM) or Feathered Friends (FF) do not EN rate their sleeping bags, but they are tried and true and are pretty accurate on their rating. Still though, for a woman, I would rate a bag 10 F higher than what it is listed at (if it is a 10 F bag, for a woman I would rate it at 20 F) simply because on average, women do sleep colder than men.

Also, I would suggest that in "winter" conditions, to get a sleeping bag rated about 10 F lower than what you are planning for. So, if you are expecting temps to about 30 F, I would say get something rated at 10 F, since you as a woman would probably only be comfortable to about 20 F in a 10 F sleeping bag. (Just my opinion. I have never heard anyone say that they wish they had brought less sleeping bag in sub freezing temps...of course within reason...don't carry a -60 F bag for 30 F temperatures... :) )

Now, if you want to get as small & light, but still every bit as warm, in a sleeping bag...you will need at least a high power down fill. I would recommend at least 800 down fill..

This is very helpful. I did see one in my price range (hate to make it all about money but I'll never going in the first place if I don't have at least a starter set) that was 800 fill. Wasn't sure if more fill made a bigger bag to stuff in the pack. Good to know about the sizing.. I'm just 5'3"...so a small bag should do me fine and save weight. Thank you also for all the tips on the other thread on my growing gear list. Bear with means I am new to navigating forums...

Have a safe trip on your 3 day-er.

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If you need a code, post below and i'll do another review to get a code.

the code also works on the clearance closet stuff too, which is already ridiculously cheap.

-Ted

I would like the code. Could you send a message to my box? Thanks!!

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TollerMom,

Here is a code that I am not going to use:

7KkEHc

Also, on down fill... the number is the amount of space (in cubic inches) 1 oz of down will fill when uncompressed. 1 oz of 650 down fill occupy 650 cubic inches when lofted up, 900 down fill will fill 900 cubic inches when lofted up. This makes a higher fill lighter because less mount is needed. If you want to fill 1800 cubic inches with down, it will take 2 oz of the 900 down fill, but 3 oz 600 down fill. Also, the lower fills (less than about 700) also uses more feathers rather than down clusters. The less feathers the better and the higher down fills contain hardly any feathers.

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TollerMom,

Here is a code that I am not going to use:

7KkEHc

Also, on down fill... the number is the amount of space (in cubic inches) 1 oz of down will fill when uncompressed. 1 oz of 650 down fill occupy 650 cubic inches when lofted up, 900 down fill will fill 900 cubic inches when lofted up. This makes a higher fill lighter because less mount is needed. If you want to fill 1800 cubic inches with down, it will take 2 oz of the 900 down fill, but 3 oz 600 down fill. Also, the lower fills (less than about 700) also uses more feathers rather than down clusters. The less feathers the better and the higher down fills contain hardly any feathers.

SCORE!!!! just ordered the 800 fill for $119. THANKS!

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tmountainnut

just another fyi, with a higher down fill power, the water absorption increases a bit. above 800 fill, it is very hydrophilic, and when it absorbs some water, it will "downgrade" the fill power. that's why anything above 800 isn't usually available, and really doesn't insulate any better in real world conditions better than 800. lower grade stuff insulates JUST AS WELL as 800, but at a weight penalty to get the lofting required.

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