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Aaron

Extending Dayhikes

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Aaron

Many hikers consider 10-15 miles a "dayhike," with longer distances requiring one or more nights in a tent. However, as the growing popularity of ultra-marathons demonstrates, some are capable of covering much more ground – 50 or 100 miles – in a single day. Elite athletes like Ueli Steck and Kilian Jornet are tackling in hours routes that traditionally took days or weeks. Because these feats demand extraordinary levels of fitness and suffering, they have limited relevance to someone simply interested in exploring and enjoying the outdoors. However, anyone is capable of using aspects of their light-and-fast approach to extend the range of dayhikes…

Sean O’Rourke with tips on making the most of the trail, all in one day. Read the full article below in Issue 18:

All in a Day’s Work

Extending Dayhikes - Longer Distances

Issue 18 Page 1

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PaulMags

My friends and I frequently did what we call "One helluva day hike". We are hikers and not runners, but we did them a at a steady clip.

The Maroon Bells loop was done (we did the Geneva Lake option for bonus miles) and the classic Pawnee Buchannan Loop.

Our "rules" were a 25/5 rule: At least 25 miles and 5000' gain. :) We do a similar hike in Boulder,CO that also takes in the foothills.

The key is not to be fast, but consistent.

Having said that..for me anyway, a sleeping outdoors is often preferable to a day hike when I can!

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Dogwood

I'm not the speed hiking animal that Mags is(Smiley) but I notice many trails are intentionally designed with short flatter more gradual spots on otherwise steeper longer sections of ascents/descents. I find this is the place to rest BY SIMPLY TAKING ADVANTAGE OF THIS to catch my breath WHILE CONTINUING TO MAKE FORWARD PROGRESS RATHER THAN TOTALLY STOPPING. This is my rest spot. Look for them on your hikes. It will increase your daily mileage.

When I'm in the "zone" I rarely stop to nosh trail foods for the sole reason of noshing. I seek out snacks that I can eat on the move. I carry them in my zippered hip belt and meshy side pockets. Likewise, having a water bottle that attaches to a shoulder strap and that can easily be reached while on the move is another time saver that can add a bit to those daily mileages. It's the same with music player, camera, gloves, beanie, etc. It all has to be in easy reach as I continue to hike.

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Aaron

I've had the same experience, just keep walking and as long as you started early enough and hike late enough you can definitely cover some ground if needed. Like Dogwood I also try to keep everything I'll need during the day in my hipbelt / pants pockets and a ZPacks Multi-Pack, combined with a hydration hose or water bottles in reachable side pockets...I'm not a fan of taking my pack off and on, (Even if I stop for a break) so this strategy definitely makes things easy!

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