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I want this soooo bad!


Gearspoke
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Nice, Griz! Sold my '99 TJ last spring and hope to bump up to a Rubicon soon. It was simply cheaper to look for the newer one than to spend thousands of bucks to get the gearing, diffs, lockers, etc. on the TJ and never have a chance to get the money back out of it.

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Nice, Griz! Sold my '99 TJ last spring and hope to bump up to a Rubicon soon. It was simply cheaper to look for the newer one than to spend thousands of bucks to get the gearing, diffs, lockers, etc. on the TJ and never have a chance to get the money back out of it.

We bought a 2012 Rubicon a couple years back and it's the daily driver. Even with Mopar's really modest 2" lift, it does pretty decent on the Jeep trails and is very drivable on the highway. That said, not near as much fun as the 3B out in the woods. The B is presently in the shop getting Holbrook springs and a new D44 front axle with an ARB. My perpetual hobby vehicle.

I've always been a bit conflicted enjoying my Jeep time. I spent my career looking at geology/soils/erosion issues related primarily to mining but all that is also applicable to motorized use. My conclusion: backcountry motorized use probably causes more problems than all other uses combined. I try not to spin wheels, most definitely steer clear of wetlands, and try to fix water bars when I find them blown out but in the big picture, that isn't enough. I feel a big part of the problem is that most backcountry motorized users are completely oblivious that a problem even exists until the gate is locked. I will say that we never go wheeling just to wheel. There is always a backpacking trip or a long day hike at the end of the Jeep trails. A means to an end rather than just the end in its self.

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Grizz, kind of why I stay on the regular trails/forest roads. I don't need to trash things to have a good time. Then again, my ex-roomate is a hydrogeologist so you can imagine getting lots of the odd fun bits of info on how it all interrelates. I'm not sure where you are but I'm in the Knoxville, TN area in which we have 4 HUGE (and I mean huge) ORV parks that are pretty well maintained.

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Grizz, kind of why I stay on the regular trails/forest roads. I don't need to trash things to have a good time.

Yes! I never stray from approved routes either and am a big believer in Treadlightly! Education is the only way motorized use can reasonably persist but present efforts at that come up short in every aspect. Treadlightly is really the only organization pushing that but is very underfunded for the job at hand. I do urge everyone I meet in the sticks to join. Not any private ORV parks around here. Mainly because they wouldn't get any paying customers with the thousands of miles of FS trails available here.

But thankfully, there are also a few million acres in this state where you can't go motorized. The Beartooth's are still my favorite place on earth.

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Another take: :D

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Another take for sure but a little more difficult to handle with the camping gear and you still can't use them in wilderness areas. If you are looking for some good trails and are in SW MT, try the Tobacco Roots. It's all open to mtn biking and there are a lot of non-motorized trails with nice loops. Some rather spectacular routes to be had. Some more painful than others--------------------

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