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Substitute for "Liner Socks"?


Aconcagua
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I'm curious if anyone has experimented with different substitutes for "liner socks?"

I was looking through a close-out bin at a local store and noticed very thin, 100% Nylon dress socks for sale at a fraction of the price of liner socks.

They looked to be very well made (they were probably formal/tux socks), the right length and they didn't have any seams in the wrong places. I was thinking about giving them a try but thought I would ask about them here first. Thanks.

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Aaron Zagrodnick

I only use a single sock most of the time but I'm sure it would work alright, I've heard of people using these as their main and only hiking sock, and I think I may have done so on a couple occasions closing in on laundry day in the past! I will however personally stick with my Darn Toughs for now, and am happy that they seem to have perfected the sizing, at least if the pair I recently received is any indication. I do use a liner sock for winter hiking and backpacking, and go with Darn Tough there as well. (Badge of Honor)

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I happened to look today and 6 pairs of thin 98% Nylon, 2% Spandex knee high dress socks cost $8.99 on sale.

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I'm like Aaron--have found a single sock to work for me.  Don't think I have had a blister in years.  I swear by smartwool socks--prefer the medium hikers.

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In winter, mainly for ski touring,  I use a ragg wool sock with a liner. 

The nylon dress socks work rather well as a liner.

 

 

 

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The first year I began backpacking I used sock liners and still got blisters.  I gave them up after that and I haven't experienced any blister issues since.  I attribute that to good hiking boots and good socks.  I use Smartwool and Darn Tough.  I have lighter socks for summer hiking, and heavier socks for fall and spring.  

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Cheapo nylon, polyester, or silk liner socks was the way I used to go with an outer merino sock mostly for wicking but also to avoid/relieve hot spots and add a tiny bit of cush. Since switching to more breathable trail runners for the majority of my backpacking, airing out my feet more often, paying much better attention to foot care on trail, having toughened up my feet's skin considerably, being anal about shoe choices that better supported my different types of backpacking and feet characteristics(trail runners that fit! that can only be achieved consistently when one  knows their body, feet, hikes, and hiking philosophies in depth)  I very  rarely need or desire sock liners with my merino socks and low cut trail runners. It's a rare occasion I get foot blisters or have very sweaty feet for long durations anymore even without the sock liners.

Good luck moving forward. The nylon socks could work for you.   

 

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I should mention, I never wear liners with trail runners. Only the ski boots which are essentially old-school leather  boots.

 

 

BK.jpg

Edited by PaulMags
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Everyone's feet are different, of course, and I would never disparage what anyone finds works for them.  

My take, though, is that boot/shoe fit is about a hundred times more important than your sock configuration.  If you are having to fool around with different sets of socks, it just means that your shoes don't fit and you are compensating for the mistake you made in buying them.  There are probably upward of a hundred high-quality well-designed makes of boots and trail runners out there.  Spend your time on finding one that you really like - this means that it is 100% fully comfortable from the moment you put it on.  If a shoe needs to be "broken in", it does not fit and you need to keep looking.

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